Thomas G. Heintzman, O.C., Q.C., FCIArb

Interpretation Saves Contract From Penalty Doctrine

Contract law contains a fundamental rule: penalty clauses are prohibited and liquidated damage clauses are permitted. But in its recent decision in Ottawa Community Housing Corp. V. Foustanellas, the Ontario Court of Appeal held that there is another way to look at this rule. The clause is valid if, properly interpreted, the clause delays, but […]

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Damage To The Rebar And The Deflection Of Floor Slabs Are Covered Under Builders’ Risk Policy: B.C. Court Of Appeal

The extent of coverage under Builders’ Risk policies is a matter of continuing debate in Canada. Insurers try to draft policies which do not cover the poor workmanship of contractors, and contractors continue to insist that they have bought and paid for insurance which covers damage to the work in progress. And so the debate […]

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Trust Fund Obligations Continue After A Lien Bond Is Filed: Supreme Court Of Canada

The Supreme Court of Canada recently released its highly anticipated decision in Stuart Olson Dominion Construction Ltd. v. Structal Heavy Steel. The court has held that the trust fund obligations on a construction project did not terminate when the contractor filed a bond in respect of the subcontractor’s lien. This decision is of fundamental importance […]

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Foreign Judgment Is Enforceable Without Proof Of Connection To Canada: Supreme Court Of Canada

In its recent decision in Chevron Corp. v. Yaiguaje, the Supreme Court of Canada has held that a foreign judgment may be enforced in Canada without the claimant demonstrating that the claim or the judgment debtor has any connection to Canada. Rather, it is the claim’s connection to the jurisdiction where the judgment was rendered […]

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Who Is Entitled To The Holdback Funds: The Contractor’s Trustee In Bankruptcy Or The Payment Bond Surety?

When a contractor goes bankrupt and the bonding company pays the subcontractors, who is entitled to the holdback funds in the owner’s hands: the contractor’s trustee in bankruptcy or the bonding company? In Iona Contractors Ltd. (Receiver of) v. Guarantee Co. of North America, the Alberta Court of Appeal recently held that the bonding company […]

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Review Of Arbitral Awards: Where Is Sattva Taking Us?

The decision of the Supreme Court of Canada in Creston Moly Corp. v. Sattva Capital Corp., 2014 SCC 53 (Sattva) is a seminal decision in the review of arbitral awards. That decision apparently set a wide net of protection around arbitral awards. It did so by ruling that an arbitral award interpreting a contract should usually be […]

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Can A Change To A Construction Contract Be Set Aside For Duress Or Coercion?

Building projects often give rise to heated discussions. When a change order is made in that sort of situation, can one party later say that the change order was made under duress or coercion? The Newfoundland Court of Appeal said Yes in the recent decision in Hickey’s Building Supplies Ltd. v. Sheppard. Background Facts This […]

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Can General Damages Be Awarded For The Breach Of A Building Contract?

Generally speaking, damages for a non-financial loss are not awarded for the breach of a business contract. That is because those sorts of damages are not foreseeable. The breach of a business contract may give rise to anxiety and distress, but that result is usually thought of as part of the vicissitudes and rough and […]

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Quebec Court of Appeal Awards Impact Damages

When a breach of a building contract occurs, the damages can be extensive because the breach can have an impact on the performance of other parts of the contract. For this reason, a unique aspect of construction disputes is the potential award of what are called “impact” costs or damages. In the recent decision of […]

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